Buttermilk Pancakes

Servings: 9 pancakes

Storage Life of Ingredients: 1 year


These buttermilk pancakes are so light and tasty. Serve with buttermilk, strawberry, maple, or coconut syrup. Yum! This is my all-time favorite pancake recipe.



Our good friend, Dave Ottley, originally shared this recipe with us. He loved to fix breakfast for his family and anyone else who happened to stop by. He became the master pancake maker in his home with this recipe.



Pictured Process



Reconstitute the buttermilk, milk, and eggs according to package directions.



Whisk the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and sugar together. We made the recipe with unbleached flour on the right, and whole wheat flour on the left.



Mix the egg, buttermilk, milk, and oil together.



Make a well in the dry ingredients and gradually stir in the wet ingredients. Do not over mix, batter should have lumps in it. Pour 1/4 cupfuls on a hot greased griddle. Cook until bubbles appear and underside is golden brown.



Flip and cook on the other side until golden brown. The pancakes with the unbleached flour are so light and fluffy, you will love them. They turned out great with the dehydrated buttermilk, crystallized eggs, and dehydrated milk. You can also make them with all-purpose flour. My husband can't have the folic acid that is in enriched flour, so we always use the organic unbleached flour.



The pancakes below are the whole wheat pancakes. This recipe did not work well with the hardiness of whole wheat because it is such a light and fluffy recipe.



We made another batch using half wheat and half unbleached flour. These turned out much better, but our favorite was still the unbleached flour batch.



Storage Tips


Flour: All-purpose flour can be stored in 5 gallon food-grade buckets with resealable lids. Layer the flour with bay leaves to keep the weevils away. Grains will keep for at least a year using this method.


Baking Powder: Baking powder has a shelf life of 1 year. Check the "best by" date on the container.


Baking Soda: Baking soda has a shelf life of 2 years. Check the "best by" date on the container.

Salt: Table salt has a shelf life of 5 years.


Sugar: I store my sugar in 5 gallon food-grade buckets with resealable lids. Sugar is best if used within 2 years.


Crystalized Eggs: Powdered whole eggs work great for baking, but if you are going to make eggs to eat as a meal, purchase crystallized eggs (or raise some chickens!). They reconstitute much easier than powdered eggs and taste like real eggs. Crystallized eggs cost about twice as much as regular eggs, so I purchase a year’s supply, but only rotate one or two cans a year. Crystallized eggs store for five to ten years, so regular eggs can be used most of the time and the stored eggs only have to be replaced every five to ten years. Once a can of eggs is opened, store the remaining eggs in a storage bag in the freezer. Label the bag with directions for reconstituting, the date it was purchased, and the date it expires. The storage life for an open can on the shelf is one month. This is an estimated storage shelf life. You should always check the expiration date on the container or check with the manufacturer.

Dehydrated Buttermilk: Once you open a can of dehydrated buttermilk, it will last a month on your pantry shelf. I repackage it into a freezer bag, label with directions for reconstituting, and store it in my freezer.

Nonfat Dehydrated Milk: Once you open a can of dehydrated ilk, it will last a month on your pantry shelf. I repackage it into a freezer bag, label with directions for reconstituting, and store it in my freezer. This way it will last as long as I have electricity to run my freezer. If the power goes out, I can make the powder into milk and easily use it up in a month's time.

Canola Oil: Oil will last at least one year in its original container on your pantry shelf.


Alternative Cooking:


Propane Camping Stove


Propane Griddle

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